Traditional recipes

Easy Dishes You Can Make With Pantry Staples

Easy Dishes You Can Make With Pantry Staples

You’d be surprised what you can make with just a handful of ingredients

Vezzani Photography/Shutterstock

One of the reasons that your grandma was a great cook is that she knew the importance of having a well-stocked pantry and how to use those budget-friendly ingredients to make breakfasts, lunches, dinners, sides and desserts. These easy, satisfying recipes primarily use the kinds of things you have on hand, such as flour, yeast, cornmeal, baking soda, spices, eggs, milk and beans and other canned goods.

Classic Pancakes

Billion Photos/ Shutterstock

Instant Pot Indian Rice Pudding

Photo courtesy of Spice Cravings

Fried Mush

Kristi Blokhin/Shutterstock

Instant Pot Oatmeal

nesavinov/Shutterstock

No-Knead Water-Rising Twists

Instant Pot Steel-Cut Oats Eight Ways

Photo courtesy of Spice Cravings

Sweet Milk Homemade Waffles

Courtesy of Karrie Truman, Happy Money Saver

Deviled Egg Salad

Elena Shashkina/Shutterstock

Cajun Chicken Sausage and Rice

Black Bean Burger

AS Food studio/Shutterstock

Creamed Corn

jreika/Shutterstock

Cast-Iron Pan Jalapeno Cornbread

vm2002/Shutterstock

Rice Krispie Treats

© L Hill | Dreamstime.com

Easy Peanut Butter Cookies

Marie C Fields/Shutterstock

Hungarian Nut Roll

MicrostockStudio/Shutterstock


22 Easy Recipes You Can Make With Pantry Staples

If you’re self-quarantined because of the coronavirus outbreak, one of the first things you should do is stock up on all the proper groceries and pantry staples that’ll get you through your long stay at home. The only trouble is, when most of us are faced with shelves full of canned tuna, dried pasta and beans, we can’t possibly imagine turning that into something delicious.

That’s where these recipes come in handy. From pasta salads to soups and sandwich fillings, we found 22 recipes that use the following pantry staples as their foundation:

Pasta: Any shape you want. A self-quarantine isn’t “Top Chef,” so no one is judging whether your pasta is the optimal shape for absorbing your sauce.

Canned tuna fish: Or canned salmon, if you wish! It can be packed in oil or water ― these recipes are versatile enough that you can make anything work.

Canned tomatoes: In this case, it truly doesn’t matter whether they’re diced, crushed or whole (you can always chop the whole ones). Just try to avoid pureed, if possible, since they’re pretty watery. We have a handy guide to which brands taste the best.

Beans: Dried or canned are both fine. Just remember that unless you have an Instant Pot, you’ll likely have to soak dried beans up to a day in advance. Go for black beans, garbanzos, black eyed peas, pintos — honestly anything you like will work for most of these recipes.

Stock/Broth: Chicken is a great choice for meat eaters, and vegetable is obviously best for vegetarians and vegans. Stock is a great tool for taking rice from boring to flavorful.

Rice: Brown has the most fiber, so will keep you feeling full longer. Otherwise, choose whatever you like best, whether it’s sushi rice, white rice, jasmine, basmati, etc.

Bread: Any kind you want! Just consider storing it in the freezer (never the refrigerator) if you think you’ll need to be eating it for longer than a few days.

Jarred pickles, capers, olives and sun-dried tomatoes: These briny ingredients will pack a ton of flavor, so keep plenty handy.

Spices: Dried herbs and spices are what’ll keep all your recipes from tasting the same. Load up on cumin, coriander, red chile flakes, cinnamon, turmeric and more.

Freezer staple: Frozen vegetables. Buy all the frozen peas, carrots, green beans, squash, spinach and other veggies that you love. They’ll freshen up all your recipes and you won’t have to worry about them rotting.

Now go check out the recipes below, and remember to be flexible and creative. If you don’t have a couple ingredients that the recipe calls for, you can likely do just fine without them or find a similar substitute. It’s all up to you! This is one thing you can actually control right now, so enjoy.


22 Easy Recipes You Can Make With Pantry Staples

If you’re self-quarantined because of the coronavirus outbreak, one of the first things you should do is stock up on all the proper groceries and pantry staples that’ll get you through your long stay at home. The only trouble is, when most of us are faced with shelves full of canned tuna, dried pasta and beans, we can’t possibly imagine turning that into something delicious.

That’s where these recipes come in handy. From pasta salads to soups and sandwich fillings, we found 22 recipes that use the following pantry staples as their foundation:

Pasta: Any shape you want. A self-quarantine isn’t “Top Chef,” so no one is judging whether your pasta is the optimal shape for absorbing your sauce.

Canned tuna fish: Or canned salmon, if you wish! It can be packed in oil or water ― these recipes are versatile enough that you can make anything work.

Canned tomatoes: In this case, it truly doesn’t matter whether they’re diced, crushed or whole (you can always chop the whole ones). Just try to avoid pureed, if possible, since they’re pretty watery. We have a handy guide to which brands taste the best.

Beans: Dried or canned are both fine. Just remember that unless you have an Instant Pot, you’ll likely have to soak dried beans up to a day in advance. Go for black beans, garbanzos, black eyed peas, pintos — honestly anything you like will work for most of these recipes.

Stock/Broth: Chicken is a great choice for meat eaters, and vegetable is obviously best for vegetarians and vegans. Stock is a great tool for taking rice from boring to flavorful.

Rice: Brown has the most fiber, so will keep you feeling full longer. Otherwise, choose whatever you like best, whether it’s sushi rice, white rice, jasmine, basmati, etc.

Bread: Any kind you want! Just consider storing it in the freezer (never the refrigerator) if you think you’ll need to be eating it for longer than a few days.

Jarred pickles, capers, olives and sun-dried tomatoes: These briny ingredients will pack a ton of flavor, so keep plenty handy.

Spices: Dried herbs and spices are what’ll keep all your recipes from tasting the same. Load up on cumin, coriander, red chile flakes, cinnamon, turmeric and more.

Freezer staple: Frozen vegetables. Buy all the frozen peas, carrots, green beans, squash, spinach and other veggies that you love. They’ll freshen up all your recipes and you won’t have to worry about them rotting.

Now go check out the recipes below, and remember to be flexible and creative. If you don’t have a couple ingredients that the recipe calls for, you can likely do just fine without them or find a similar substitute. It’s all up to you! This is one thing you can actually control right now, so enjoy.


22 Easy Recipes You Can Make With Pantry Staples

If you’re self-quarantined because of the coronavirus outbreak, one of the first things you should do is stock up on all the proper groceries and pantry staples that’ll get you through your long stay at home. The only trouble is, when most of us are faced with shelves full of canned tuna, dried pasta and beans, we can’t possibly imagine turning that into something delicious.

That’s where these recipes come in handy. From pasta salads to soups and sandwich fillings, we found 22 recipes that use the following pantry staples as their foundation:

Pasta: Any shape you want. A self-quarantine isn’t “Top Chef,” so no one is judging whether your pasta is the optimal shape for absorbing your sauce.

Canned tuna fish: Or canned salmon, if you wish! It can be packed in oil or water ― these recipes are versatile enough that you can make anything work.

Canned tomatoes: In this case, it truly doesn’t matter whether they’re diced, crushed or whole (you can always chop the whole ones). Just try to avoid pureed, if possible, since they’re pretty watery. We have a handy guide to which brands taste the best.

Beans: Dried or canned are both fine. Just remember that unless you have an Instant Pot, you’ll likely have to soak dried beans up to a day in advance. Go for black beans, garbanzos, black eyed peas, pintos — honestly anything you like will work for most of these recipes.

Stock/Broth: Chicken is a great choice for meat eaters, and vegetable is obviously best for vegetarians and vegans. Stock is a great tool for taking rice from boring to flavorful.

Rice: Brown has the most fiber, so will keep you feeling full longer. Otherwise, choose whatever you like best, whether it’s sushi rice, white rice, jasmine, basmati, etc.

Bread: Any kind you want! Just consider storing it in the freezer (never the refrigerator) if you think you’ll need to be eating it for longer than a few days.

Jarred pickles, capers, olives and sun-dried tomatoes: These briny ingredients will pack a ton of flavor, so keep plenty handy.

Spices: Dried herbs and spices are what’ll keep all your recipes from tasting the same. Load up on cumin, coriander, red chile flakes, cinnamon, turmeric and more.

Freezer staple: Frozen vegetables. Buy all the frozen peas, carrots, green beans, squash, spinach and other veggies that you love. They’ll freshen up all your recipes and you won’t have to worry about them rotting.

Now go check out the recipes below, and remember to be flexible and creative. If you don’t have a couple ingredients that the recipe calls for, you can likely do just fine without them or find a similar substitute. It’s all up to you! This is one thing you can actually control right now, so enjoy.


22 Easy Recipes You Can Make With Pantry Staples

If you’re self-quarantined because of the coronavirus outbreak, one of the first things you should do is stock up on all the proper groceries and pantry staples that’ll get you through your long stay at home. The only trouble is, when most of us are faced with shelves full of canned tuna, dried pasta and beans, we can’t possibly imagine turning that into something delicious.

That’s where these recipes come in handy. From pasta salads to soups and sandwich fillings, we found 22 recipes that use the following pantry staples as their foundation:

Pasta: Any shape you want. A self-quarantine isn’t “Top Chef,” so no one is judging whether your pasta is the optimal shape for absorbing your sauce.

Canned tuna fish: Or canned salmon, if you wish! It can be packed in oil or water ― these recipes are versatile enough that you can make anything work.

Canned tomatoes: In this case, it truly doesn’t matter whether they’re diced, crushed or whole (you can always chop the whole ones). Just try to avoid pureed, if possible, since they’re pretty watery. We have a handy guide to which brands taste the best.

Beans: Dried or canned are both fine. Just remember that unless you have an Instant Pot, you’ll likely have to soak dried beans up to a day in advance. Go for black beans, garbanzos, black eyed peas, pintos — honestly anything you like will work for most of these recipes.

Stock/Broth: Chicken is a great choice for meat eaters, and vegetable is obviously best for vegetarians and vegans. Stock is a great tool for taking rice from boring to flavorful.

Rice: Brown has the most fiber, so will keep you feeling full longer. Otherwise, choose whatever you like best, whether it’s sushi rice, white rice, jasmine, basmati, etc.

Bread: Any kind you want! Just consider storing it in the freezer (never the refrigerator) if you think you’ll need to be eating it for longer than a few days.

Jarred pickles, capers, olives and sun-dried tomatoes: These briny ingredients will pack a ton of flavor, so keep plenty handy.

Spices: Dried herbs and spices are what’ll keep all your recipes from tasting the same. Load up on cumin, coriander, red chile flakes, cinnamon, turmeric and more.

Freezer staple: Frozen vegetables. Buy all the frozen peas, carrots, green beans, squash, spinach and other veggies that you love. They’ll freshen up all your recipes and you won’t have to worry about them rotting.

Now go check out the recipes below, and remember to be flexible and creative. If you don’t have a couple ingredients that the recipe calls for, you can likely do just fine without them or find a similar substitute. It’s all up to you! This is one thing you can actually control right now, so enjoy.


22 Easy Recipes You Can Make With Pantry Staples

If you’re self-quarantined because of the coronavirus outbreak, one of the first things you should do is stock up on all the proper groceries and pantry staples that’ll get you through your long stay at home. The only trouble is, when most of us are faced with shelves full of canned tuna, dried pasta and beans, we can’t possibly imagine turning that into something delicious.

That’s where these recipes come in handy. From pasta salads to soups and sandwich fillings, we found 22 recipes that use the following pantry staples as their foundation:

Pasta: Any shape you want. A self-quarantine isn’t “Top Chef,” so no one is judging whether your pasta is the optimal shape for absorbing your sauce.

Canned tuna fish: Or canned salmon, if you wish! It can be packed in oil or water ― these recipes are versatile enough that you can make anything work.

Canned tomatoes: In this case, it truly doesn’t matter whether they’re diced, crushed or whole (you can always chop the whole ones). Just try to avoid pureed, if possible, since they’re pretty watery. We have a handy guide to which brands taste the best.

Beans: Dried or canned are both fine. Just remember that unless you have an Instant Pot, you’ll likely have to soak dried beans up to a day in advance. Go for black beans, garbanzos, black eyed peas, pintos — honestly anything you like will work for most of these recipes.

Stock/Broth: Chicken is a great choice for meat eaters, and vegetable is obviously best for vegetarians and vegans. Stock is a great tool for taking rice from boring to flavorful.

Rice: Brown has the most fiber, so will keep you feeling full longer. Otherwise, choose whatever you like best, whether it’s sushi rice, white rice, jasmine, basmati, etc.

Bread: Any kind you want! Just consider storing it in the freezer (never the refrigerator) if you think you’ll need to be eating it for longer than a few days.

Jarred pickles, capers, olives and sun-dried tomatoes: These briny ingredients will pack a ton of flavor, so keep plenty handy.

Spices: Dried herbs and spices are what’ll keep all your recipes from tasting the same. Load up on cumin, coriander, red chile flakes, cinnamon, turmeric and more.

Freezer staple: Frozen vegetables. Buy all the frozen peas, carrots, green beans, squash, spinach and other veggies that you love. They’ll freshen up all your recipes and you won’t have to worry about them rotting.

Now go check out the recipes below, and remember to be flexible and creative. If you don’t have a couple ingredients that the recipe calls for, you can likely do just fine without them or find a similar substitute. It’s all up to you! This is one thing you can actually control right now, so enjoy.


22 Easy Recipes You Can Make With Pantry Staples

If you’re self-quarantined because of the coronavirus outbreak, one of the first things you should do is stock up on all the proper groceries and pantry staples that’ll get you through your long stay at home. The only trouble is, when most of us are faced with shelves full of canned tuna, dried pasta and beans, we can’t possibly imagine turning that into something delicious.

That’s where these recipes come in handy. From pasta salads to soups and sandwich fillings, we found 22 recipes that use the following pantry staples as their foundation:

Pasta: Any shape you want. A self-quarantine isn’t “Top Chef,” so no one is judging whether your pasta is the optimal shape for absorbing your sauce.

Canned tuna fish: Or canned salmon, if you wish! It can be packed in oil or water ― these recipes are versatile enough that you can make anything work.

Canned tomatoes: In this case, it truly doesn’t matter whether they’re diced, crushed or whole (you can always chop the whole ones). Just try to avoid pureed, if possible, since they’re pretty watery. We have a handy guide to which brands taste the best.

Beans: Dried or canned are both fine. Just remember that unless you have an Instant Pot, you’ll likely have to soak dried beans up to a day in advance. Go for black beans, garbanzos, black eyed peas, pintos — honestly anything you like will work for most of these recipes.

Stock/Broth: Chicken is a great choice for meat eaters, and vegetable is obviously best for vegetarians and vegans. Stock is a great tool for taking rice from boring to flavorful.

Rice: Brown has the most fiber, so will keep you feeling full longer. Otherwise, choose whatever you like best, whether it’s sushi rice, white rice, jasmine, basmati, etc.

Bread: Any kind you want! Just consider storing it in the freezer (never the refrigerator) if you think you’ll need to be eating it for longer than a few days.

Jarred pickles, capers, olives and sun-dried tomatoes: These briny ingredients will pack a ton of flavor, so keep plenty handy.

Spices: Dried herbs and spices are what’ll keep all your recipes from tasting the same. Load up on cumin, coriander, red chile flakes, cinnamon, turmeric and more.

Freezer staple: Frozen vegetables. Buy all the frozen peas, carrots, green beans, squash, spinach and other veggies that you love. They’ll freshen up all your recipes and you won’t have to worry about them rotting.

Now go check out the recipes below, and remember to be flexible and creative. If you don’t have a couple ingredients that the recipe calls for, you can likely do just fine without them or find a similar substitute. It’s all up to you! This is one thing you can actually control right now, so enjoy.


22 Easy Recipes You Can Make With Pantry Staples

If you’re self-quarantined because of the coronavirus outbreak, one of the first things you should do is stock up on all the proper groceries and pantry staples that’ll get you through your long stay at home. The only trouble is, when most of us are faced with shelves full of canned tuna, dried pasta and beans, we can’t possibly imagine turning that into something delicious.

That’s where these recipes come in handy. From pasta salads to soups and sandwich fillings, we found 22 recipes that use the following pantry staples as their foundation:

Pasta: Any shape you want. A self-quarantine isn’t “Top Chef,” so no one is judging whether your pasta is the optimal shape for absorbing your sauce.

Canned tuna fish: Or canned salmon, if you wish! It can be packed in oil or water ― these recipes are versatile enough that you can make anything work.

Canned tomatoes: In this case, it truly doesn’t matter whether they’re diced, crushed or whole (you can always chop the whole ones). Just try to avoid pureed, if possible, since they’re pretty watery. We have a handy guide to which brands taste the best.

Beans: Dried or canned are both fine. Just remember that unless you have an Instant Pot, you’ll likely have to soak dried beans up to a day in advance. Go for black beans, garbanzos, black eyed peas, pintos — honestly anything you like will work for most of these recipes.

Stock/Broth: Chicken is a great choice for meat eaters, and vegetable is obviously best for vegetarians and vegans. Stock is a great tool for taking rice from boring to flavorful.

Rice: Brown has the most fiber, so will keep you feeling full longer. Otherwise, choose whatever you like best, whether it’s sushi rice, white rice, jasmine, basmati, etc.

Bread: Any kind you want! Just consider storing it in the freezer (never the refrigerator) if you think you’ll need to be eating it for longer than a few days.

Jarred pickles, capers, olives and sun-dried tomatoes: These briny ingredients will pack a ton of flavor, so keep plenty handy.

Spices: Dried herbs and spices are what’ll keep all your recipes from tasting the same. Load up on cumin, coriander, red chile flakes, cinnamon, turmeric and more.

Freezer staple: Frozen vegetables. Buy all the frozen peas, carrots, green beans, squash, spinach and other veggies that you love. They’ll freshen up all your recipes and you won’t have to worry about them rotting.

Now go check out the recipes below, and remember to be flexible and creative. If you don’t have a couple ingredients that the recipe calls for, you can likely do just fine without them or find a similar substitute. It’s all up to you! This is one thing you can actually control right now, so enjoy.


22 Easy Recipes You Can Make With Pantry Staples

If you’re self-quarantined because of the coronavirus outbreak, one of the first things you should do is stock up on all the proper groceries and pantry staples that’ll get you through your long stay at home. The only trouble is, when most of us are faced with shelves full of canned tuna, dried pasta and beans, we can’t possibly imagine turning that into something delicious.

That’s where these recipes come in handy. From pasta salads to soups and sandwich fillings, we found 22 recipes that use the following pantry staples as their foundation:

Pasta: Any shape you want. A self-quarantine isn’t “Top Chef,” so no one is judging whether your pasta is the optimal shape for absorbing your sauce.

Canned tuna fish: Or canned salmon, if you wish! It can be packed in oil or water ― these recipes are versatile enough that you can make anything work.

Canned tomatoes: In this case, it truly doesn’t matter whether they’re diced, crushed or whole (you can always chop the whole ones). Just try to avoid pureed, if possible, since they’re pretty watery. We have a handy guide to which brands taste the best.

Beans: Dried or canned are both fine. Just remember that unless you have an Instant Pot, you’ll likely have to soak dried beans up to a day in advance. Go for black beans, garbanzos, black eyed peas, pintos — honestly anything you like will work for most of these recipes.

Stock/Broth: Chicken is a great choice for meat eaters, and vegetable is obviously best for vegetarians and vegans. Stock is a great tool for taking rice from boring to flavorful.

Rice: Brown has the most fiber, so will keep you feeling full longer. Otherwise, choose whatever you like best, whether it’s sushi rice, white rice, jasmine, basmati, etc.

Bread: Any kind you want! Just consider storing it in the freezer (never the refrigerator) if you think you’ll need to be eating it for longer than a few days.

Jarred pickles, capers, olives and sun-dried tomatoes: These briny ingredients will pack a ton of flavor, so keep plenty handy.

Spices: Dried herbs and spices are what’ll keep all your recipes from tasting the same. Load up on cumin, coriander, red chile flakes, cinnamon, turmeric and more.

Freezer staple: Frozen vegetables. Buy all the frozen peas, carrots, green beans, squash, spinach and other veggies that you love. They’ll freshen up all your recipes and you won’t have to worry about them rotting.

Now go check out the recipes below, and remember to be flexible and creative. If you don’t have a couple ingredients that the recipe calls for, you can likely do just fine without them or find a similar substitute. It’s all up to you! This is one thing you can actually control right now, so enjoy.


22 Easy Recipes You Can Make With Pantry Staples

If you’re self-quarantined because of the coronavirus outbreak, one of the first things you should do is stock up on all the proper groceries and pantry staples that’ll get you through your long stay at home. The only trouble is, when most of us are faced with shelves full of canned tuna, dried pasta and beans, we can’t possibly imagine turning that into something delicious.

That’s where these recipes come in handy. From pasta salads to soups and sandwich fillings, we found 22 recipes that use the following pantry staples as their foundation:

Pasta: Any shape you want. A self-quarantine isn’t “Top Chef,” so no one is judging whether your pasta is the optimal shape for absorbing your sauce.

Canned tuna fish: Or canned salmon, if you wish! It can be packed in oil or water ― these recipes are versatile enough that you can make anything work.

Canned tomatoes: In this case, it truly doesn’t matter whether they’re diced, crushed or whole (you can always chop the whole ones). Just try to avoid pureed, if possible, since they’re pretty watery. We have a handy guide to which brands taste the best.

Beans: Dried or canned are both fine. Just remember that unless you have an Instant Pot, you’ll likely have to soak dried beans up to a day in advance. Go for black beans, garbanzos, black eyed peas, pintos — honestly anything you like will work for most of these recipes.

Stock/Broth: Chicken is a great choice for meat eaters, and vegetable is obviously best for vegetarians and vegans. Stock is a great tool for taking rice from boring to flavorful.

Rice: Brown has the most fiber, so will keep you feeling full longer. Otherwise, choose whatever you like best, whether it’s sushi rice, white rice, jasmine, basmati, etc.

Bread: Any kind you want! Just consider storing it in the freezer (never the refrigerator) if you think you’ll need to be eating it for longer than a few days.

Jarred pickles, capers, olives and sun-dried tomatoes: These briny ingredients will pack a ton of flavor, so keep plenty handy.

Spices: Dried herbs and spices are what’ll keep all your recipes from tasting the same. Load up on cumin, coriander, red chile flakes, cinnamon, turmeric and more.

Freezer staple: Frozen vegetables. Buy all the frozen peas, carrots, green beans, squash, spinach and other veggies that you love. They’ll freshen up all your recipes and you won’t have to worry about them rotting.

Now go check out the recipes below, and remember to be flexible and creative. If you don’t have a couple ingredients that the recipe calls for, you can likely do just fine without them or find a similar substitute. It’s all up to you! This is one thing you can actually control right now, so enjoy.


22 Easy Recipes You Can Make With Pantry Staples

If you’re self-quarantined because of the coronavirus outbreak, one of the first things you should do is stock up on all the proper groceries and pantry staples that’ll get you through your long stay at home. The only trouble is, when most of us are faced with shelves full of canned tuna, dried pasta and beans, we can’t possibly imagine turning that into something delicious.

That’s where these recipes come in handy. From pasta salads to soups and sandwich fillings, we found 22 recipes that use the following pantry staples as their foundation:

Pasta: Any shape you want. A self-quarantine isn’t “Top Chef,” so no one is judging whether your pasta is the optimal shape for absorbing your sauce.

Canned tuna fish: Or canned salmon, if you wish! It can be packed in oil or water ― these recipes are versatile enough that you can make anything work.

Canned tomatoes: In this case, it truly doesn’t matter whether they’re diced, crushed or whole (you can always chop the whole ones). Just try to avoid pureed, if possible, since they’re pretty watery. We have a handy guide to which brands taste the best.

Beans: Dried or canned are both fine. Just remember that unless you have an Instant Pot, you’ll likely have to soak dried beans up to a day in advance. Go for black beans, garbanzos, black eyed peas, pintos — honestly anything you like will work for most of these recipes.

Stock/Broth: Chicken is a great choice for meat eaters, and vegetable is obviously best for vegetarians and vegans. Stock is a great tool for taking rice from boring to flavorful.

Rice: Brown has the most fiber, so will keep you feeling full longer. Otherwise, choose whatever you like best, whether it’s sushi rice, white rice, jasmine, basmati, etc.

Bread: Any kind you want! Just consider storing it in the freezer (never the refrigerator) if you think you’ll need to be eating it for longer than a few days.

Jarred pickles, capers, olives and sun-dried tomatoes: These briny ingredients will pack a ton of flavor, so keep plenty handy.

Spices: Dried herbs and spices are what’ll keep all your recipes from tasting the same. Load up on cumin, coriander, red chile flakes, cinnamon, turmeric and more.

Freezer staple: Frozen vegetables. Buy all the frozen peas, carrots, green beans, squash, spinach and other veggies that you love. They’ll freshen up all your recipes and you won’t have to worry about them rotting.

Now go check out the recipes below, and remember to be flexible and creative. If you don’t have a couple ingredients that the recipe calls for, you can likely do just fine without them or find a similar substitute. It’s all up to you! This is one thing you can actually control right now, so enjoy.